ASC Programme Centre Beta

Feed Standard

Acronym List

ABAccreditation Body
AfiAccountability Framework initiative
ASCAquaculture Stewardship Council
ASIAssurance Services International
CABConformity Assessment Body
CARCertification and Accreditation Requirements
CASSConservation Alliance for Seafood Solutions
CITESConvention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
CoCCCChain of CustodyCode of Conduct
D/CDeforestation and Conversion
DDDue Diligence
ELEntry Level
EEMPEnergy Efficiency Management Plan
EMPEffluent Management Plan
EUEuropean Union
FAOUN Food and Agriculture Organization
FIPFishery Improvement Project
FPICFree, Prior and Informed Consent
GDPGross Domestic Product
GHGGreenhouse Gas
GM / GMOGenetically Modified  / Genetically Modified Organism
ILOInternational Labour Organization
IPCCIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
ISEALInternational Social and Environmental Accreditation and Labelling (Alliance)
IUCNInternational Union for Conservation of Nature
LLAIMMJMLLogo Licence AgreementIngredient Manufacturermegajoulesmegalitres
MSCMSLMarine Stewardship CouncilMajority Sustainability Level
NGONon-Governmental Organisation
OHCHROffice of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
PDCAPlan-Do-Check-Act
PPEPersonal Protective Equipment
RUoCRequirements for the Unit of Certification
SDGUN Sustainable Development Goal
tTonne (1,000 kg)
ToCTheory of Change
UNUnited Nations
UDHRUniversal Declaration of Human Rights
UoCUnit of Certification
WCEPWater Conservation and Efficiency Plan
WMPWaste Management Plan

Definition List

The definitions applicable to this Standard can be accessed through the ASC Vocabulary Portal.

Section A1 Water consumption calculation

Water and consumption shall be calculated as follows:

Water consumption – indicator 1.18.2:
1Identify the year the calculation relates to. This is set as the previous calendar year (1 January – 31 December).
2Calculate the total production volume of product (t) within the defined time-period (step 1).
3List all sources of water, separated into the categories “freshwater” and “other water”[184], used during the production process, from ingredient receiving to final product dispatch

  • municipal water supplies (tap/mains water)
  • surface water sources (including from wetlands, rivers, lakes, collected/harvested rainwater)
  • ground water sources (e.g. wells)
  • seawater
  • produced water[185]
4Calculate the quantity of water used[186] (megalitres) per water source (step 3) within the set time period (step 1).
5Sum the quantities of water used (step 4).
6Calculate the total water use (step 5) per total product produced/year (step 2) and express in megalitres/t.
7Report the results of steps 4, 5 and 6 to ASC via data@asc-aqua.org, using the template provided on the ASC website.

Section A2 Effluent discharge calculation

Effluent discharge shall be calculated as follows:

Effluent discharge – indicator 1.20.2:
1Identify the year the calculation relates to. This is set as the previous calendar year (1 January – 31 December).
2List all effluent by destination, separated into the categories “freshwater” and “other water”, generated during the production process, from ingredient receiving to final product dispatch:

  • municipal treatment facilities,
  • surface water (including wetlands, rivers, lakes),
  • ground water,
  • seawater
  • produced water[185]
3Calculate the quantity of effluent discharged (megalitres) per destination (step 2) within the set time period (step 1).
4Sum the quantities of effluent discharged (step 3).
5Report the results of steps 3 and 4 to ASC via data@asc-aqua.org, using the template provided on the ASC website.

Section A3 Energy consumption calculation

Energy consumption shall be calculated as follows:

Energy consumption – indicator 1.21.2:
1Identify the year the calculation relates to. This is set as the previous calendar year (1 January – 31 December).
2Calculate the total production volume of product (t) within the defined time period (step 1).
3List all sources of energy used during the production process, from ingredient receiving to final product dispatch:
Scope 1—on-site consumption of energy carriers, including: 

  • diesel (L)
  • petrol/gasoline (L)
  • natural gas (m3)
  • other fuels (specify)

    Scope 2—electricity and other off-site energy generation, including:

  • electricity (kWh), specifying:
  • electricity derived from the national or regional grid
  • electricity from an off-grid renewable source (specify source)
  • electricity from an off-grid non-renewable source that is not otherwise included in on-site fuel consumption (specify source)
  • district heating/cooling (kWh)
4Calculate the quantity used per energy source (step 3) within the set time period (step 1).
5Convert[188] the quantities used (step 4) to MJ and sum the totals.
6Calculate the total energy use in MJ (step 5) per tonne of product produced in the assessment year (step 2).
7Report the results of steps 4, 5 and 6 to ASC via data@asc-aqua.org, using the template provided on the ASC website.

Section A4 Waste consumption calculation

Waste consumption shall be calculated as follows:

Waste consumption – indicator 1.19.2:
1Identify the year the calculation relates to. This is set as the previous calendar year (1 January – 31 December).
2List the composition of waste by destination, separated into hazardous and non-hazardous waste, generated during the production process, from ingredient to receiving to final product dispatch:

  • recovery by re-use[189]
  • recovery by recycling[190] (including composting)
  • recovery by other means (specify)
  • disposal by incineration[191] (with energy recovery)
  • disposal by incineration (without energy recovery)
  • disposal by landfilling[192]
  • disposal by other means such as dumping, open burning (specify)
3Calculate the quantity of waste generated (tonne) per destination (step 2) within the set time period (step 1).
4Sum the quantities of waste generated (step 3).
5Report the results of steps 2, 3 and 4 to ASC via data@asc-aqua.org, using the template provided on the ASC website.

Section B GHG Emission calculation – indicator 1.21.4

For the purposes of estimating GHG emissions associated with aquafeeds, calculations shall include the following inputs within each of the emissions scopes defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol[1]:

  • Scope 1—emissions from the on-site consumption of energy carriers (diesel, petrol/gasoline, natural gas) as quantified in Section A3.
  • Scope 2—emissions associated with the purchase of electricity and other off-site energy generation (e.g. district heating) as quantified in Section A3.
  • Scope 3—emissions associated with the production, processing, and transport of ingredients from crop, fishery, poultry/livestock, and other raw material sources.

GHG emissions shall be calculated as follows:

  1. List inputs to feed production, including those energy inputs included in Section A3 as well as any feed ingredients that make up at least 1% of the average raw material feed composition.
  2. Calculate the quantity of each input used in the production of one tonne of feed in the previous calendar year (1 January – 31 December).
  3. Determine and record appropriate emission factors and their sources, communicated in kg CO2-equivalent units, for each input listed in step 1. See further details below.
  4. Multiply the quantity of each input from step 2 by the respective emission factor in step 3 to calculate the total emissions from each input associated with one tonne of feed.
  5. Sum the total emissions associated with one tonne of feed in kg CO2-eq units.
  6. Report results from 2, 3, 4, and 5 to ASC via data@asc-aqua.org, using the template provided on the ASC website.

Determining appropriate emission factors for inputs—Emission factors can be modelled directly, extracted from databases (e.g. Agri-footprint, ecoinvent), or calculated using ASC’s online GHG calculator. The source of emission factors should be clearly stated. If modelling emission factors directly, include all GHGs and use the most recent 100-year global warming potential characterisation factors from IPCC[2]. Feed ingredient emission factors shall include biogenic emissions where relevant (e.g. methane emissions from rice paddies) as well as emissions from land use change (e.g. clearing of forest for agricultural crop production) if transformation occurred within the previous 20 years. Land use change calculations shall be specific to the source country and follow recognised methods as detailed in available standards[3][4]. Carbon sequestered in plant and animal material shall not be considered in calculation of emission factors (i.e. do not subtract sequestered carbon from the emission factors of raw material in feed ingredients), as this carbon is returned to the atmosphere upon consumption. In allocating impacts between co-products from feed production systems (e.g. fish by-product meal, feather meal), the preferred method of allocation is by relative mass, in accordance with available seafood product category rules for carbon footprint specifications[5][6][7]. If another allocation method is used instead, it shall be clearly stated along with reasoning for its use.

To facilitate ease of calculation and consistency across assessments, producers can also use the GHG calculator provided via the ASC website to provide emission factors and calculations.

DD Assessments and where they need to occur

  1. Ingredient manufacturer[193];
    1. Marine-based ingredients
    2. Plant-based ingredients
    3. Feed stuffs (e.g. land animal, algae, insects based)
  2. Primary raw material[194]:
    1. Marine-based primary raw material[195];
    2. Plant-based primary raw material.

DD Process

In line with the concept of the Risk Management Framework in Annex 7, the Due Diligence (DD) process is carried out according to predefined risk factors and includes a series of steps, with each step adapted to the risk in the local context. These steps follow a set sequence and include the following elements:

1

Define intent/purpose

  • This first step can be skipped as the intent has already been defined within these standards.
2

Define the risk factors

  • Use the risk factors outlined in table 1.
3

Assess the risk

  • Assess the level of risk. A risk assessment is not needed where the level of risk for the risk factors has been pre-determined as low according to pathway 1) ASC country score cards or pathway 4) ASC approved certifications listed in table 1.
4

Implement appropriate measures

  • Take action and implement measures where the outcome of the risk assessment does not determine low risk:
    • prevention 
    • mitigation
    • remediation
    • cease sourcing, however, where possible mitigation is preferred over the discontinuation of sourcing.
5

Monitor:

  • monitor the risk factors, or indicators for the risk factors, to ensure the risk level determined remains valid;
  • monitor the effectiveness of measures implemented.
    • Repeat the risk management process when:
      • monitoring indicates a different risk level than previously determined,
      • monitoring indicates that measures implemented are not effective, 
      • significant changes occur, which could affect the risk level previously determined,
      • in all cases, at least every certification cycle (3 years).

More guidance on implementing due diligence processes can be found in the UN guiding principles[196] and the OECD due diligence guidance[197].

DD Risk Factors

The UoC needs to demonstrate low risk for ingredient manufacturers, marine and plant-based primary raw material production at least for the Risk Factors outlined in Table 1. Ingredient manufacturers are companies/facilities that produce the ingredient used by the feed manufacturer.

Risk Factors
Table 1: Due Diligence Risk Factors for Ingredient Manufacturers, as well as for marine and plant-based primary raw material production, and schemes to demonstrate low risk.

LegalSocialEnvironmental
Risk factors for Ingredient ManufacturersThe risk that the ingredient manufacturer does not meet the following indicator:1.1.1 legal licenses and permits, by operating in an area affected by poor regulatory oversight resulting in systematic violations of laws and regulation. The risk that the ingredient manufacturer does not meet the following Criteria:
  • 1.3 appl. labour regulations
  • 1.4 forced labour1.5 children and young workers1.6 discrimination
  • 1.13 grievance mechanism
The risk that the ingredient manufacturer does not meet the following Criteria:
  • 1.17 appl. environmental regulations
  • 1.18 water use
  • 1.19 waste handling
  • 1.20 effluent handling
    And Indicators:
  • 3.4.2 GMO disclosure
  • 3.4.3 disclosure of medicinal additives
  • Third-party schemes demonstrating low risk for Ingredient Manufacturers for the risk factors listed above[198]See ASC website for approved schemes
    See ASC website for approved schemes 

    See ASC website for approved schemes
    Risk factors for Marine-based primary raw material producers 
    The risk that primary raw material originates from areas affected by poor regulatory oversight resulting in systematic illegal fishing within the fishery.

    The risk that primary raw material is produced using forced labour or worst forms of child labour.

    The risk that primary raw material originates from unreported or unregulated fishing.
    The risk that primary raw material originates from species that are IUCN endangered or critically endangered species.
    The risk that primary raw material originates from species caught that appear in the CITES appendices. 
    Third-party schemes demonstrating low risk for marine-based primary raw material producers for the risk factors listed aboveMSC certified fisheries
    MarinTrust approved fisheries
    Fisheries certified to GSSI-recognised fisheries schemes
    See ASC website for approved schemes
    MSC certified fisheries
    MarinTrust approved fisheries
    Fisheries certified to GSSI-recognised fisheries schemes
    Risk factors for Plant-based primary raw material producers
    The risk that primary raw material originates from areas affected by poor regulatory oversight resulting in systematic violations of land use or environmental laws and regulation within the plant-based primary raw material production. 

    The risk that primary raw material is produced using forced labour or worst forms of child labour.

    The risk that primary raw material originates from areas resulted from illegal deforestation/conversion. 
    Third-party schemes demonstrating low risk for plant based primary raw material producers for the risk factors listed aboveSee ASC website for approved schemesSee ASC website for approved schemesSee ASC website for approved schemes

    DD Pathways to Determine Low risk

    Any of the four pathways 1) Country Score Card, 2) sectoral/fishery assessment, 3) ingredient manufacturer assessment, or 4) certification shall be used to determine the level of risk for each risk factor. Different pathways can be used to assess the different risk factors for legal, social and environment (see table 1). If a pathway does not result in low risk, another pathway shall be chosen. If none of the pathways enable the UoC to determine low risk, the UoC will not source from such supply chains until implemented mitigation measures have achieved low risk. For plant and marine-based raw material and in the case of co-mingling (i.e. mixed), material with the highest risk classifies the blend and whether or not the entire blend can be sourced. An illustration of the four different pathways which can be used for Due Diligence determination of low risk can be found in Figure 5, Annex 7.

    The pathways are:

    1

    Country Score Card:

    • ASC will provide a Country Risk Card on the ASC website that ranks the country risk level into low, medium and high risk, regarding the Risk Factors in Table 1. For countries scored low risk for the respective risk factors, no further DD steps are required for that particular risk factor by the UoC. For any countries which do not yet have a Country Risk Card, a different pathway is required to determine low risk.
    2

    Sub-national/sectoral assessment (for plant-based raw material production) / Industry/sector assessment (for ingredient manufacturer) / Fishery assessment (for marine-based raw material production):

    • The UoC conducts an assessment of the sector / industry / fishery to demonstrate a low risk for the Risk Factors as listed in Table 1.
    • Where low risk has been demonstrated, evidence shall include:
      • risk assessment or a summary thereof;
      • risk assessment outcome i.e., risk level per risk factor;
      • implemented monitoring program.
    3

    Ingredient Manufacturer assessments[199]:

    • The UoC works with the ingredient manufacturer to demonstrate that the ingredient manufacturer, marine or plant-based primary raw material has a low risk for the Risk Factors as listed in Table 1. For marine and plant-based primary raw material production risk factors, the assessment relates to whether or not the ingredient manufacturer has an appropriate system or sufficient information to ensure low risk at the raw material production level. 
    • Where low risk has been demonstrated, evidence shall include:
      • risk assessment or a summary thereof;
      • risk assessment outcome i.e., risk level per risk factor;
      • measures taken and their effectiveness;
      • implemented monitoring program.
    4

    Certification:

    • ASC considers the schemes listed in Table 1 to address the Risk Factors to ensure low risk. For marine-based primary raw material production, the UoC may use the IUCN Red List and CITES Appendix I, II, III List to demonstrate low risk for the two environmental risk factors relating to endangered species, as listed in Table 1[200].

    Calculation of the Majority Sustainability Level (MSL)

    Step 1: Determine the whole fish Sustainability Category 

    All whole fish marine ingredients must be scored according to the table below. The following table explains how to assign the Sustainability Category to whole fish marine ingredients.

    Table 2: This table describes the Sustainability Category assigned to whole fish marine ingredients.

    CategoriesWhole fish used as raw material sourced under the following conditions
    Category 1
    • Raw material is approved according to the MarinTrust Improvement Programme, and;
    • Raw material is listed active as (basic)[201] FIP on www.fisheryprogress.org, and;
    • The ingredient manufacturer is a MarinTrust Improver Programme Accepted Site (or equivalent[202]), and;
    • The ingredient received by the UoC is MarinTrust CoC certified from factory to feed mill or the UoC can demonstrate a verified traceability system from factory to mill.
    Category 2
    • Raw material is approved according to the MarinTrust Standard (or equivalent[203]), and; 
    • The ingredient manufacturer is MarinTrust certified (or equivalent), and;
    • The ingredient received by the UoC is MarinTrust CoC certified from factory to feed mill or the UoC can demonstrate a verified traceability system from factory to mill.
    Category 3
    • Raw material is approved according to the MarinTrust Standard (or equivalent), and;
    • Raw material is engaged in a comprehensive[204] FIP and is listed active as such on www.fisheryprogress.org, and;
    • Raw material remains approved according to the MarinTrust Standard until Category 4 is achieved, and;
    • The ingredient manufacturer is MarinTrust certified (or equivalent), and;
    • The ingredient received by the UoC is MarinTrust CoC certified from factory to feed mill or the UoC can demonstrate a verified traceability system from factory to mill.
    Category 4
    MSC Chain of Custody (Default Version); raw material is Marine Stewardship Council Chain of Custody certified (or equivalent[205]).

    Step 2: Determine the Majority Sustainability Level

    After determining the sustainability categories of whole fish marine ingredients, feed manufacturers need to calculate the Majority Sustainability Level (MSL) for the entire UoC. Majority is defined as ≥50% (i.e. 50%, or higher) of whole-fish volume.

    2.1

    Volume Calculation

    First, the volumes of marine ingredients shall be calculated per type. Volumes are calculated in tonnes. Marine ingredients are divided into the following types:

    1. Volume from marine ingredients (whole-fish and by-products);
    2. Volume from whole-fish marine ingredients;
      1. Volume of total whole-fish marine ingredients;
      2. Volume of whole-fish marine ingredients scoring at Category 1 (table 2);
      3. Volume of whole-fish marine ingredients scoring at Category 2 (table 2);
      4. Volume of whole-fish marine ingredients scoring at Category 3 (table 2);
      5. Volume of whole-fish marine ingredients scoring at Category 4 (table 2);
      6. Volume of whole-fish marine ingredients that does not score at Category 1-4 (table 2);
    2.2

    Majority calculation

    Second, volumes per type of marine ingredients are used to calculate the Majority Sustainability Level using the following formulae:

    • Baseline applies, where no volume can be attributed to any of the categories 1-4. 
    • Level 1 applies, when the volume of 2.2 above 50% of the volume 2.1;
    • Level 2 applies, when the volume of 2.3 above 50% of the volume 2.1;
    • Level 3 applies, when the volume of 2.4 above 50% of the volume 2.1;
    • Level 4 applies, when the volume of 2.5 above 50% of the volume 2.1;

    Note: where the majority calculation leads to two potential levels, the following shall apply:

    • Level 2 applies, when [(volume 2.3) + (volume 2.4) + (volume 2.5)] 50% (volume 2.1);
    • Level 3 applies, when [(volume 2.4) + (volume 2.5)] 50% (volume 2.1);

    Note: by-products are not factored into the majority calculation.

    2.3

    Prior to initial certification

    The volume calculation in 2.1 includes marine ingredients received in the 24-month period before the initial audit. The MSL calculation in 2.2 is based on this volume and forms the Entry Level on the MSL-improvement ladder. 

    2.4

    After initial certification

    The volume calculation in 2.1 is repeated annually and includes marine ingredients received over a 12 month period, January to December.

    Calculation of Mass Balance Eligible Volume

    1. Determining Eligible Ingredients

    Not all marine and plant ingredients which can be sourced by the UoC also count towards the mass balance eligible volume. The following ingredients count towards the mass balance eligible volume:

    • Marine-based ingredients:
      • by-products from aquaculture, by-catch retained under the EU landing obligation
      • by-products from fisheries (if Due Diligence indicates low risk)
      • whole fish (if Due Diligence indicates low risk, the sustainability category is 1-4)
    • Plant-based ingredients:
      • Category 1) Plant ingredients known to have global risks, i.e. soy/palm oil (if Due Diligence indicates low risk, Deforestation/Conversion (D/C)-free commitment made, low risk demonstrated for legal D/C). 
      • Category 2) Highest-volume plant ingredients (if Due Diligence indicates low risk, D/C free commitment made, low risk for legal D/C demonstrated OR an action plan is under implementation).
      • Category 3) other plant ingredients (if Due Diligence indicates low risk, D/C free commitment made).
    • Feed stuffs (if Due Diligence indicates low risk)
    • Feed additives
    • Ingredients which represent <1% of the total annual ingredient-weight (volume) received by the UoC for use in aquafeeds

    The following ingredients can be sourced but do not count towards the mass balance eligible volume:

    • Marine-based ingredients:
      • whole fish (if Due Diligence indicates low risk but not scoring at sustainability category 1-4) 
    • Plant-based ingredients:
      • Category 1) Plant ingredients known to have global risks, i.e. soy/palm oil (if Due Diligence indicates low risk and D/C free commitment made, low risk for legal D/C cannot be demonstrated but an action plan is under implementation).

    Figure 1: Determining eligible ingredients

    Figure 2: Determining eligible plant ingredients

    Deforestation / conversion (D/C) risk assessment outcome and implications for the sourcing of plant-based ingredients. In this version of the standard, no distinct sourcing requirements apply to category 3) ingredients with a high risk or ingredients without demonstrated low risk in relation to deforestation or land conversion in plant-ingredient supply chains. This will be reviewed by ASC and could change in future versions of the standard.

    2. Calculating the Eligible Volume

    Follow these four steps to calculate the mass balance eligible volume:

    1. Sum volume (tonnes) of eligible marine ingredients
    2. Sum volume (tonnes) of eligible plant ingredients
    3. Sum volume (tonnes) of eligible feed stuffs
    4. Sum volume (tonnes) feed additives.

    The sum of the volumes of eligible ingredients 1) – 4) above equals the “mass balance eligible volume”.

    Figure 3: Eligible Ingredients Models

    Assurance Procedure for Deforestation / Conversion free Supply Chains

    Plant-based ingredients used by the UoC need to be assessed for their level of risk for the Risk Factors listed in Table 3. This additional step is focused on risk related to (legal) deforestation and land conversion.

    Table 3: Risk Factors for plant-based ingredients, and schemes to demonstrate low risk.

    Environmental
    Risk factors for Plant-based primary raw material
    The risk that primary raw material originates from areas resulted from legal deforestation / conversion.
    Third-party schemes demonstrating low risk for plant based primary raw materials for the risk factors listed above[206]See ASC website

    The UoC may choose one of four pathways to assess and determine risk related to deforestation and conversion.

    Different pathways can be used to assess the risk factor deforestation / conversion. If a pathway does not result in low risk, another pathway shall be chosen.  In the case of co-mingling (i.e. mixed) of ingredients, material with the highest risk classifies the blend.

    The pathways are:

    1

    Country Score Card:

    • ASC will provide a Country Risk Card on the ASC website that ranks the country risk level into low, medium and high risk, regarding the Risk Factor in Table 3. For countries scored low risk for the respective risk factor, no further risk assessment steps are required by the UoC. For any countries which do not yet have a Country Risk Card, a different pathway is required to determine low risk.
    2

    Sub-national/sectoral assessment:

    • The UoC conducts an assessment of sub-national or sectoral level.
    • Where low risk has been demonstrated, evidence shall include:
      • risk assessment or a summary thereof;
      • risk assessment outcome i.e., risk level;
      • implemented monitoring program.
    3

    Ingredient Manufacturer assessments[207]:

    • The UoC works with the ingredient manufacturer to demonstrate that plant-based primary raw material has a low risk for the Risk Factor as listed in Table 3.
    • Where low risk has been demonstrated, evidence shall include:
      • risk assessment or a summary thereof;
      • risk assessment outcome i.e. risk level;
      • measures taken and their effectiveness;
      • implemented monitoring program.
    • Where low risk has not yet been achieved, however, an action plan is under implementation to achieve the public commitment, evidence shall include:
      • analysis of traceability of the primary raw material
      • risk assessment or a summary thereof;
      • risk assessment outcome i.e., risk level per risk factor;
      • measures taken and their effectiveness
      • Implemented monitoring program
      • Status of progress in relation to quantitative and geographically-specific targets and milestones in the public action plan
    4

    Certification:

    • ASC considers the schemes listed in Table 3 to address the Risk Factor to ensure low risk.

    Flowcharts illustrating requirements for DD, D/C-free risk assessment and summary tables of permitted work types

    Figure 4: General process outline for Risk Management Frameworks.

    Figure 5: Illustration of the four different pathways which can be used for Due Diligence determination of low risk.

    Table 4: Permitted type of work per age group. This table summarises the type of work allowed for each age group. The shaded cells indicate what is prohibited.

    Age
    Type of Work
    ≥ 18 
    Adult
    15(14[208]) – 17 
    Young Employee, Child
    13(12[209]) – 14 
    Child
    < 13(12) 
    Child
    All work; including hazardous work
    Non-hazardous work  
    Light work  

    Table 5: Permitted working hours and rest per age group

    Age groupWorking hours / rest
    Adult≥188 h/day &48 h/wk
    12 h/wk
    must be exceptional & voluntary
    1 h/ 8 h11 h24 h (1 day)
    3 paid working wks
    comply with laws & industry standards on premium rates, working hours, breaks, daily rest, weekly rest and health assessments for night work.

    Young Employee, child

    15(14[210]) – 17
    8 h/day &40 h/wk0.5 h/ 4.5 h12 h48 h (2 days)not allowed to work between 10pm & 6am

    Child

    13(12[211]) – 14
    3 h/day &14 h/wk0.5 h/ 3 h14 hnot allowed to work between 8pm & 6am
    Working hours(maximum hours; excluding breaks)Overtime(maximum hours per week)Breaks(minimum hours per work shift)Daily Rest(minimum consecutive hours per 24h)Weekly Rest (minimum consecutive hours per 7 days)Annual Leave(minimum per 1 year of full-time service)Night Work

    UoC requirements on publishing information and reporting to ASC

    Report TitleMake publicReport to ASCTemplateIndicator
    Water Consumption ReportNoYesYes1.18.2
    Water Conservation and Efficiency PlanNoNoNo1.18.4
    Waste Disposal ReportNoYesYes1.19.2
    Waste Management PlanNoNoNo1.19.3
    Effluent ReportNoNoNo1.20.2
    Effluent Management PlanNoNoNo1.20.3
    Energy Consumption ReportNoYesYes1.21.2
    Energy Efficiency PlanNoNo No1.21.3
    GHG Emissions ReportYesYesYes1.21.4
    Ingredients and Primary Raw Material ReportYesNoYes2.2.3
    2.2.4
    Due Diligence and Pathways ReportYesYesYes2.2.10
    Sectoral/fishery Assessment or Ingredient Manufacturer Assessment Summary ReportYesYesYes2.2.11
    Volume of Product Sold (Mass Balance) ReportNoYesYes3.2.4
    Volume of Product Sold (Segregation) ReportNoYesYes3.2.5
    Majority Sustainability Level ReportYesYesYes4.1.5
    Volume of Marine Ingredients ReportYesYesYes4.1.6
    Deforestation and Conversion Free Plant Ingredients Progress ReportYesNoNo5.1.11
    Low Risk Plant Ingredients ReportYesYesYes5.1.12